Crime and Punishment

Error Saving Reaction

Crime and Punishment

I can't get too excited about victimless crimes, that is to say crimes in which the only victim is the person committing it. Those who want to self-destruct - provided the consequences are not shouldered by others - have the right to do it. Everyone has the moral responsibility for their own person.

Crimes against others is another matter. Nobody has the right to inflict physical harm on another. Nor does anyone have the right to harm us emotionally or economically. There are degrees of damage, obviously. Defamation does not bring the harm that torture, rape or murder does. In a just world, the punishment must fit the crime.

Perfect justice must begin with absolute proof of guilt. Such is often not the case as evidenced by the numerous prisoners exonerated by DNA testing. Punishment meted out unfairly is one of the cruelest forms of torture. The desire to give innocence every chance to emerge is perhaps in large measure the reason our criminal justice system often bogs down with technicalities and loopholes.

If a person is guilty of violent crime what do we do then? The first step in a rational approach is to decide whether we want violent criminals to be free to roam our streets. We could be "kind and understanding" and let them go after a little counseling. But the evidence does not demonstrate that works. To be safe we'd all have to arm ourselves as increasing numbers of violent criminals roamed the streets.

If we are to protect ourselves from such criminals, there are two logical choices:

1. We lock them away in a box six feet under ground after executing them. The most just way to do the killing is exactly the way they did it to their victim. That is a permanent solution, sure and just but it makes me uneasy since there is almost always the question of true guilt.

2. We lock them away in some type of secure institution. Since I am trying to come up with a logical solution, that institution would not be our present prison system.

The second option leaves room for the possibility of exoneration with new exculpatory evidence. But if not prison, what? Criminals should be put on secure restitution work farms instead. There they will toil producing useful labor or goods for society commensurate with the damage they have done. The victim's medical bills, lost work and incapacities must be paid for by the offender. Moreover, all the costs to society for investigations, trials and room and board while incarcerated must be paid. (A great motivation for those guilty to admit it and reduce the legal costs.) The time it takes for economic restitution would by and large dictate the length of the term. For example, if you attack another, incapacitating them, then you get to spend whatever time is necessary earning the money to take care of them. Those who take another's life must substitute their own life with a lifetime of productive work to repay society and the victim's family.

Isn't this an obvious solution? Mere imprisonment with society picking up the tab for the police and legal work and the maintenance of the criminal is nuts. Why should the victim and society pay for the evils of the wrongdoer?

How do you force someone in prison to work off his or her debt? Give them a choice. Either do it or go without food and shelter. That is the law that works throughout nature so why not apply it to humans? How do you maintain discipline on the farm? Well, a hard day's work will leave little energy for much more than rest. As it is now, prisoners sitting in cells all day have nothing other to do with their energy than scheme more wrongdoing. With my idea those who are a problem get penalized with an extension of their stay and longer work shifts.

This is a fair and just way to deter crime and offset the damage created by it. It does not have the potential of unjustly taking the life of another since time would be provided for proof of innocence. And I'm not talking chain gang here, but rather passable work and living conditions with the product of labor going where it should, to the victims and society. U.S. companies are always looking for a cheaper labor force. Well here it is, right on our own shores numbering in the tens of thousands.
There is nothing better to sober someone up and drain them of the energy to think up nefarious deeds than a hard day's work. For minor offenders who have a stint in these restitution farms and are then released, they will know what work is, actually improve their resume, spread the word on the street that crime means hard work and be motivated not to return. If they repeat offend, then society will not be the one to suffer. Criminals should be self-maintaining, even a profit center rather than an economic sinkhole.

Our present penal system does not work. It is a huge and unjust cost to society. To many it neither serves as punishment nor deterrent. About three quarters of all U.S. prison space has been built in the last decade. Just in California the chances that a person either lives or works in a prison is 1 in 200.

It's a crazy state of affairs. I wish I could be warden of the world tomorrow and fix it all.

Views: 256
0
0
0
Author: Regular Articles
Dr. Wysong is a former veterinary clinician and surgeon, college instructor in human anatomy, physiology and the origin of life, inventor of numerous medical, surgical, nutritional, athletic and fitness products and devices, research director for the present company by his name and founder of the philanthropic Wysong Institute. He is author of The Creation-Evolution Controversy now in its eleventh printing, a new two volume set on philosophy for living, several books on nutrition, prevention and health for people and animals and over 15 years of monthly health newsletters. He may be contacted at Wysong@Wysong.net and a free subscription to his e-Health Letter is available at http://www.wysong.net
Tell a friend
Average rating:
(0 votes)
Average rating from Reviews:
(0 votes)

Write a review

Reviews

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Freeport-McMoRan, Newmont Mining, Golden Star Resources, Randgold Resources and Kinross Gold

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Freeport-McMoRan, Newmont Mining, Golden Star Resources, Randgold Resources and Kinross Gold Read More

Gold Mining Stock Outlook - Sept. 2017

Gold Mining Stock Outlook - Sept. 2017 Read More

Why Freeport-McMoran (FCX) Stock Might be a Great Pick

Freeport-McMoran (FCX) is seeing solid earnings estimate revision activity, and is a great company from a Zacks Industry Rank perspective. Read More

Friend of slain Georgia Tech student: 'If Scout was more gender-conforming, would it have been different?'

Scout Schultz, a Georgia Tech student, was shot by campus police on Saturday night, and a protest two days later led to arrests. In the aftermath of those events, Yahoo Lifestyle talked to a friend... Read More

How to Make Healthy Leftover Turkey Tacos

These tacos get a healthy makeover by using turkey as the main lean protein. It all comes together with some beans, avocado, and a little cheese. Watch the video to learn how to make this easy... Read More

Little People, Big World's Audrey Roloff Just Gave Birth to Her First Child

It's a girl! Read More

Mel Brooks: ‘Blazing Saddles’ Would Never Be Made in Today’s ‘Stupidly Politically Correct’ Culture

“Blazing Saddles” may be a groundbreaking comedy, but director Mel Brooks doesn’t think Hollywood would make the iconic Western parody in this current “stupidly politically correct” climate. The... Read More

Box Office: 'Kingsman: The Golden Circle' Unseats 'It' as 'Lego Ninjago' Disappoints

Kingsman: The Golden Circle is the new ruler of the box office. The sequel from Fox is expected to earn $39 million this weekend from 4,003 locations. That’s slightly below where tracking had... Read More

Bradley Cooper-Lady Gaga’s ‘Star Is Born’ Moves to May 2018

Warner Bros.’ “A Star Is Born” remake starring Stefani Germanotta (Lady Gaga) and Bradley Cooper, who is also directing, is moving up its release to May 18, 2018. The pic was originally set to open... Read More

White House officials defend Trump, say athletes 'can do free speech on their own time'

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin defended Trump’s call for NFL players who kneel during the national anthem to be suspended or fired. “It’s not about free speech,” Mnucin said Sunday. “They can do... Read More

In wake of U.N. speech, Kim calls Trump a ‘dotard.’ Trump fires back at ‘madman.’

President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un have unleashed personal attacks on one another after the U.S. commander in chief’s speech at the United Nations. “Kim Jong Un of North Korea,... Read More

As Russia probe turns to fake Facebook ads, Trump follows with a tweet

President Trump continued his efforts to belittle accusations of Russian meddling in the 2016 election on Friday, turning to the latest set of charges, involving targeted political ads placed on... Read More

Reluctant champion: How Nadia Murad has become the international face of Yazidi suffering – and resilience

Weeks earlier, Nadia Murad had been ripped from her village by Islamic State (ISIS) fighters who murdered her family and took her captive. Along with other young Yazidi women, she was transported... Read More

Readers write: The work of downsizing, evidence of climate change, hopeful coverage on famine

Regarding the Aug. 21 Monitor Daily story “Home prices, and a thought shift, give ‘small living’ a boost”: Interesting concept. My friend has done it, downsizing and living in a tiny apartment.... Read More

Time for the world to step up on Rohingya issue, Aung San Suu Kyi’s astounding hypocrisy, Irma’s destruction in Britain’s Caribbean islands, The US should stop saber rattling, On the Nadal-Federer comeback

“It is high time the world made an all-out effort to stop the ongoing pogrom against Myanmar’s minority Rohingya...,” writes Mohammad Amjad Hossain. “The pogrom resembles those crimes perpetrated... Read More